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Applebee’s tip credit case to go to trial

Applebee’s tip credit case to go to trial


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A lawsuit challenging Applebee’s tip credit policies for servers and bartenders will go to trial later this year after the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear an attempt to stop the case.

The Supreme Court’s move leaves intact a lower court’s ruling that will allow the Applebee’s tip-credit case to proceed to trial in September.

The wage-and-hour lawsuit was originally filed in 2006, and alleged that Applebee’s was underpaying servers and bartenders by applying a tip credit even for hours when employees did not perform tip-producing work, such as cleaning, taking inventory and setting tables.

In a statement, Applebee’s said, “We respect the Supreme Court’s decision today not to intervene at this time in this case and many others. While we do not comment on pending litigation, we will further defend our case in the lower court.”

The plaintiffs argued that employees should be paid the full minimum wage for time spent on non-tip-producing duties. They cited a Department of Labor interpretation of the U.S. Fair Labor Standards Act, which contends that employees who spend more than 20 percent of their time on non-tipped work are not entitled to a tip credit.

A federal court in Missouri had allowed the case to proceed to trial, but Applebee’s attempted to have the lower court’s decision overturned, arguing that non-tip-producing duties are a necessary part of a service job, and that the tip credit is allowed in certain states as long as combined pay reaches the federal minimum wage.

Labor attorney Anthony Zaller of Van Vleck Turner & Zaller in Los Angeles, who is unaffiliated with the Applebee’s case, said the Supreme Court’s decision not to hear the case does not necessarily reflect the merits of the argument either way.

“It could have been they were too busy,” he said.

The outcome of the Applebee’s case will also not impact employers in states were a tip credit is not allowed, including California.

Based in Kansas City, Mo., Applebee’s operates or franchises more than 2,000 restaurants globally. The casual-dining chain is a subsidiary of Glendale, Calif.-based DineEquity Inc.

Contact Lisa Jennings at [email protected]
Follow her on Twitter: @livetodineout


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

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But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Ex-Classmate of Murdered Brooklyn Girl Is Indicted 10 Years After Her Death

On Father’s Day in 2006, a Brooklyn high school student named Chanel Petro-Nixon went for a job interview at an Applebee’s restaurant just blocks from her apartment in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood. Chanel, 16, was an avid reader and a straight-A student. She never came back.

Within about a day, her mother, Lucita Petro-Nixon, reported her missing. Three days after that, a woman taking out the trash found Chanel’s body, strangled and partly clothed, in a garbage bag on the street outside her building on Kingston Avenue in the Crown Heights neighborhood. As the weeks went by, posters offering a reward for information dotted Chanel’s neighborhood, but nobody came forward. So every year after, Ms. Petro-Nixon and her husband, Garvin Nixon, have joined with friends and relatives to honor Chanel at a memorial march.

But on Wednesday, nearly 10 years to the day that Chanel disappeared, the authorities announced a major break: A man had been indicted in her murder.

Prosecutors said that Chanel had gone to meet the man, Veron Primus, at her interview on the day she vanished and that the two were former classmates who went to the same church. While the police had long considered Mr. Primus, 29, “a person of interest,” it was only in the last few months that they were able to make a case.

At a news conference held outside the Applebee’s, on Fulton Avenue, Ken Thompson, the Brooklyn district attorney, said that Mr. Primus, who once lived in Crown Heights, was in custody on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent on unrelated charges of kidnapping one woman and murdering another. He was deported to the island from New York last year after serving a prison term for assaulting a different woman and violating a protective order she had against him. Mr. Primus was also accused of rape in that case but was found not guilty of the charge.

Robert K. Boyce, the chief of detectives for the New York Police Department, said at the news conference that investigators from the 77th Precinct tried to find evidence against Mr. Primus for years. Finally, last August, the investigation was handed over to the department’s Cold Case Squad.

Then, in April, Chief Boyce said, detectives working on the case received a call from the authorities in St. Vincent with what seemed to be a fresh lead connecting Mr. Primus to Chanel’s death. Neither Chief Boyce nor Mr. Thompson would discuss that evidence.

Image

But last month, the New York television station WPIX interviewed the woman Mr. Primus is accused of kidnapping in St. Vincent, Mewanah Hadaway. Ms. Hadaway told a reporter that before Mr. Primus locked her in a wooden shed for three months this year, he showed her a news clipping on Chanel’s murder.

Mr. Thompson’s office is working with the State and Justice Departments to extradite Mr. Primus from St. Vincent. He said it was a complicated process that could take weeks or months.

“It is a bittersweet day today for the family,” Ms. Petro-Nixon said outside the Applebee’s, with a tattoo of her daughter partially revealed under a sleeve of her dress. “Finally, we can see a little light at the end of the tunnel.”

After Ms. Petro-Nixon spoke, Letitia James, the city’s public advocate, and Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, stood in front of the cameras, asking anyone with information on the case to come forward. So did the Rev. W. Taharka Robinson, the pastor of the New Life Tabernacle Church.

“It’s like the T-shirt says,” Mr. Robinson suggested, pulling back the lapels of his blazer. On his shirt was a photo of Chanel, a number for the Police Department’s tip line and a logo reading: “Somebody knows something.”


Watch the video: Behind the scenes at Applebees (July 2022).


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