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Coney Island May Get a Hooters

Coney Island May Get a Hooters


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A Surf Avenue landlord thinks the 'breastaurant' will be a perfect fit; he's not wrong

Considering the history of the Mermaid Parade and the annual hot dog eating contest at Coney Island, it makes sense that some enterprising landlords want to get Hooters in on the action.

New York Daily News reports that a landlord is vying to get Hooters to serve beer, wings, and a show on Surf Avenue.

Park Slope's family-friendly neighborhood previously rejected a potential Hooters outpost in the area, but landlord Natan Bukai says "for Coney Island, it is very good."

Bukai's broker Joe Vitacco pointed out that at Coney Island, "You have a Mermaid Parade with half-naked people. You have a beach with bikinis. This is not a place where kids become amoral if they see a piece of leg."

Word. Hooters representatives say they weren't actually looking in Brooklyn (Park Slope got burned there), but may look into Coney Island for 2013. Perhaps we can have a boneless chicken wing eating contest to rival Nathan's hot dogs?


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Coney Island Texas Weiners as they used to be (and recipe for the real sauce!).

Does anyone around Scranton remember how good Coney Island Texas Weiners used to be? The man who owned that restaurant made great hot dogs! After he passed away, his kids wound up fighting over the restaurant. Now there are two Coney Islands in Scranton, and neither one serves hot dogs with that same great sauce the father made.

Yankee Lunch on Pittston Avenue still makes a good Texas Weiner.

To shorten a long story, my father worked with a man who knew the father at Coney Island. It took YEARS to get the recipe for the sauce, but here it is. It's amazingly simple, and there really aren't any set measurements. You just have to adjust things to taste.

Place about 1 and a half pounds of LEAN ground beef in a sauce pot. Add about 5 or 6 tablespoons of brown deli-style mustard, 3 or 4 tablespoons of chili powder, one finely chopped small to medium onion, and a little water. Don't add too much water, or the sauce will be too soupy. Mix all ingredients well while slowly heating the sauce. Continue to slowly heat, stirring every few minutes, until the sauce reaches a boil. Add water a little at a time if too thick.

I like mine served on a butterflied, fried Gutheinz frankfurter, with brown deli musterd and chopped Vidalia onion, served on a National Bakery bun.


Watch the video: The Bottle- Hooters Commercial 1997 (May 2022).