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Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Precut Fruit Now Responsible for 117 Illnesses in 10 States

Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Precut Fruit Now Responsible for 117 Illnesses in 10 States


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April 25,2019 Update:

The CDC announced yesterday the salmonella outbreak is now linked to 117 illnesses in 10 states—putting 32 in the hospital.

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"If you cannot determine if any precut melon you purchased was produced by Caito Foods LLC, don't eat it and throw it away," the announcement said.

April 14, 2019 Update:

Caito Foods is voluntarily recalling fresh cut watermelon, cut honeydew melon, cut cantaloupe, and fresh cut fruit containing melon due to potential salmonella contamination, according to a statement from the FDA. This comes on the heels of another packaged fruit recall involving Caito foods we reported on last year (more information below.)

The fruit was distributed in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The recalled products were sold at Kroger, Walmart, Target, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon/Whole Foods. For a full list of products and stores involved in the recall, click here.

The recall is still under investigation, but the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control have already linked 93 illnesses to this specific strain of salmonella.

Consumers are urged not to consume the recalled fruit. You may return the items to your original place of purchase for a refund, or call 844-467-7278 for more information.

June 20, 2018 Update:

The latest release from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention adds 10 new cases to the multi-state salmonella outbreak linked to pre-cut melon, bringing the total affected by the foodborne illness to 70. Thirty four of these victims have become so sick that they've been rushed to the hospital, with the most recent report of illness occurring on June 3, 2018.

The oldest person who has contracted salmonella poisoning is 97 years old, and the youngest is under a year old. Almost 70 percent of patients are female. No deaths have been reported.

Friday, June 15, 2018 Update:

The list of states affected by a massive salmonella-fueled recall of cut melon has ballooned to 23, adding Alabama, California, Florida, Kansas, Maryland, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Tennessee to the list, the Food and Drug Administration reported last week.

It was previously reported that pre-cut and prepped watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, and fruit salads are being pulled from shelves in stores such as Walmart, Kroger, Costco, Amazon, and Sprouts Farmers Market within these states. But the FDA has taken the notice one step further by posting a full list of affected locations, alongside their physical address in each state, right here.

The affected distributors (Caito Foods Distribution, Gordon Food Service, and SpartanNash Distribution) have asked customers to throw out any product and the FDA has stopped stores from selling products from these distributors as well.

The melon has caused 60 individuals to fall ill between April 30 and May 28, reported initially during the same time period as the E. coli romaine lettuce outbreak that killed five earlier this year. This is not the only salmonella outbreak that the FDA is currently looking into this month—just this morning, a new recall was announced by the Kellogg company due to a salmonella contamination affecting its Honey Smacks cereal, causing an additional 60 illnesses across 30 different states.

According to the CDC, salmonella kills 450 people each year, with symptoms including severe diarrhea, fever, and abdonminal pain that can occur anywhere from 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food.

The original article, published Monday, June 11, 2018, continues below:

---

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that there is an outbreak of salmonella linked to pre-cut melon purchased at several popular grocery chains. The outbreak currently affects eight states: Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, and Ohio.

According to the CDC, over 60 people have been infected, and 31 have been hospitalized. So far, no one has died.

The pre-cut melon was sold in “clear, plastic clamshell containers at Costco, Jay C, Kroger, Payless, Owen’s, Sprouts, Trader Joe’s, Walgreens, Walmart, and Whole Foods/Amazon,” according to a statement from the CDC.

The affected melon was distributed by Caito Foods Distribution, Gordon Food Service, and SpartanNash Distribution, and it included pre-cut cantaloupe, watermelon, or a fruit salad mix with melon.

If you believe you have purchased an affected product from these groups, the CDC urges you to throw it away or return them to your place of purchase for a refund.

This investigation is ongoing, and we will update this story with more information as it becomes available.


This Food Causes More Sickness Than Any Other, According to the CDC

Chicken is far and away the most popular source of protein in the U.S. Who doesn’t love a glorious roast chicken or, let’s face it, a hearty serving of fried chicken from time to time? However, it’s important to note this popular protein is also the most popular when it comes to food poisoning.

According to a recent report from the CDC, announcements about several types of food poisoning infections have been increasing in frequency over the last few years. This doesn&apost necessarily mean food is getting less safe, however, but mostly shows that the new tools put in place to identify outbreaks are working.

The most common cases of infection consistently remain the same—salmonella and campylobacter, which are both bacteria—and government agencies are putting more effort into reducing and tracking these outbreaks. Both are spread through animal feces and are often found in chicken products.

Salmonella is the more widely known illness, and outbreaks can come from a wide variety of foods like eggs, meat, dairy, and produce, while campylobacter is pretty strictly linked to chicken consumption. Last year, the USDA said 22 percent of production plants did not meet standards for limiting salmonella contamination in chicken parts. Salmonella contamination has gone down in whole birds, but data for more popular chicken parts—like legs and breasts—have only recently started being tracked by the agency.

Even still, Tony Corbo of Food and Water Watch—a food safety advocacy group—told the Associated Press salmonella and campylobacter are allowed in raw poultry sold in supermarkets. This is why health experts advise people to properly handle and cook poultry.

Interested in learning more about food safety?

When it comes to handling raw chicken, it’s important to take the utmost caution—avoiding common mistakes, like rinsing it or reusing kitchen tools that have come into contact with the raw chicken. Having a specific cutting board designated for raw meat is a good way to avoid cross-contamination. When it comes to cooking chicken, ensure it has been cooked thoroughly—to at least 165. If you don&apost have one, get a good meat thermometer for checking the temperature. Check out our tips for sauteéing, cooking from frozen, and grilling.

E.coli is third most common foodborne illness in the U.S. and tends to get more press than both salmonella and campylobacter, as it is the most dangerous. E.coli outbreaks have been linked to raw meat and produce. Ensuring you are practicing proper hygiene and food safety techniques, along with staying abreast of the latest recall news, is the best way to remain E.coli free.

While this report is based on data from only 10 states, it is seen as an indicator for foodborne illness trends across the country. The report explains the difficulties of understanding food poisoning due to the high volume of unreported cases, inconsistent diagnostic methods, and constantly changing product production practices and consumer eating habits.


Salmonella Outbreak Responsible for 117 Illnesses Is Linked To Pre-Cut Fruits

The CDC announced the salmonella outbreak is now caused 117 illnesses in 10 states, putting 32 in the hospital, yesterday.

CDC, FDA, and public health and regulatory officials are investigating multistate Salmonella outbreak in several states that causing 117 illnesses in 10 states and 32 hospitalizations.

Officials have linked this outbreak to pre-cut melons sold by Caito Foods LLC in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Public health investigators are using the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may be part of this outbreak.

“If you cannot determine if any pre-cut melon you purchased was produced by Caito Foods LLC, don’t eat it and throw it away,” the announcement said.

Caito Foods recalled, fresh cut watermelon, cut honeydew melon, cut cantaloupe, and fresh cut fruit containing melon due to potential salmonella contamination, according to a statement from the FDA.

The fruit was sent in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The recalled products were sold at Kroger, Walmart, Target, Trader Joe’s, and Amazon/Whole Foods.

According to the latest report, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 10 more new cases to the multi-state salmonella outbreak linked to pre-cut melon, bringing the total affected by the food-borne illness to 70.

Thirty-four victims have become so ill that they’ve been rushed to the hospital, with the most recent report of illness occurring on June 3, 2018.

The oldest person who got sick from salmonella poisoning is 97 years old, and the youngest is under a year old, 70 percent of patients are female. No deaths have been reported yet.

According to the CDC, salmonella kills 450 people each year, and the symptoms are severe diarrhea, fever, and abdominal pain that can affect you anywhere from 12 to 72 hours after eating contaminated food.

If you think you have purchased an affected product, the CDC will advise you to throw it away or return them to your place of purchase for a refund.

If anyone in your family or around you became ill with a Salmonella infection, including Reactive Arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), after consuming contaminated food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella attorneys for a free case evaluation.


  • Precut fruit raises your risk of foodborne illnesses, including Salmonella poisoning. Salmonella has been found in precut melons twice in two years
  • Precut fruit is more expensive, oxidation reduces vitamin retention, respiration increases deterioration and food additives may be used to retain color and texture
  • Precut fruit requires constant refrigeration and is usually packaged in plastic containers &mdash much of which ends up in landfills or the ocean, adding to pollution around the globe
  • Purchasing food from high-quality, small-scale local sources is one of the best ways to protect yourself from foodborne illness and exposure to pesticides another is to strengthen your immune system by avoiding sugar, getting quality sleep, reducing stress and optimizing your vitamin D level

Eating more vegetables may be one of the simplest choices you can make to improve your health. Just about any vegetable is good for you, but some are better than others. Some fruits, lower in fructose, are also healthy as they contain high amounts of antioxidants.

In one study1 from the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers found a suboptimal diet was culpable in developing cardiometabolic diseases.2 Good food identified in the study to reduce the risk of cardiometabolic diseases included fruit, vegetables, nuts and seeds, seafood and red meat.

As I&rsquove discussed before, overeating fructose in any form may lead to obesity, Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, fruit in moderation is a healthy addition to your diet.

As you choose your fruits and vegetables, keep in mind that whole food is best. Outbreaks of Listeriosis,3 Cyclosporiasis4 and Salmonella5,6 associated with packaged salads, precut vegetable trays and precut melon have been reported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Precut Fruit Raises Your Risk of Foodborne Illnesses

In the summer of 2018,7 the CDC began investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella linked to precut melons supplied by Caito Foods in Indianapolis. The outbreak included cantaloupe, watermelon and fruit salad mix. When the outbreak appeared to be over, the CDC reported 77 people had been infected and 36 were hospitalized.8

In what eerily mimicked the 2018 outbreak, Caito Foods was once again at the center of a precut melon recall less than a year later. April 12, 2019, the company announced the recall of fresh-cut melon products.9 According to the CDC10 these included precut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe and precut fruit medley. The products had been distributed to 16 states and sold under multiple labels.

The investigation began April 2, 2019 22 days later, 117 people were found to have been infected across 10 states, of which 32 required hospitalization.11 In addition to throwing out the recalled food, the CDC has specific recommendations to clean your refrigerator as the bacteria may spread to drawers or shelves. You'll find the instructions at cdc.gov/foodsafety/communication/clean-refrigerator-steps.html.

Symptoms of salmonella poisoning, which include stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, bloody diarrhea and fever, may be experienced 12 to 72 hours after eating a contaminated product and may last four to seven days12 Keith Warriner, a professor of food science at the University of Guelph, talks about the risks precut fruit presents:13

&ldquoThe problem with processed produce is that much like when you get a scratch on your skin, once it&rsquos been cut, it loses a layer of protection and is exposed to [possible contamination]. Melons, in particular, are an extreme example because their flesh is the best growth medium for salmonella.&rdquo

Since melons are grown on the ground, the skin may pick up pathogens. These are easily transferred into the fruit as you cut through the skin. Warriner recommends14 thoroughly scrubbing the skin with a brush under running water before cutting. Either eat the melon immediately or refrigerate it, as Salmonella may double every 30 minutes.

The High Price of Precut Produce

The high price you may pay for precut convenience does not end with potential bacterial contamination. As you may have expected, as it is a convenience item, precut fruit costs more than it does to buy the whole fruit and prepare it at home. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics,15 in 2017, food was the third largest household expense, behind housing and transportation.

In 2018, Vice16 did a comparison between precut and whole fruits and vegetables. They found that by buying whole and preparing at home, the average person would save $100 each month. For instance, they priced broccoli whole at $2.99 a pound, but the chopped florets were $4.99 a pound, and pineapple was $2.99 a pound but prepared and precut was $4.99 a pound.

One of the largest jumps was red onions, sold whole for 49 cents a pound at Walmart, but diced were $4.00 a pound.17 After factoring the additional cost into your budget, if you still consider purchasing precut fruit (a more nutritious choice than processed junk food), it's also important to recognize that cutting exposes the flesh to oxygen and light, which increases oxidation and affects vitamin retention.

In an interview with Men&rsquos Health,18 Caroline West Passerrello,19 consulting dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, pointed out that whole fruits and vegetables also retain their vitamins longer than those exposed to the light. Since much of the water evaporates faster, water soluble vitamins are also at risk.

Cutting fruit increases the respiration rate leading to more active metabolism and faster deterioration.20 Despite being detached from the plant, the fruit remains a living organism after harvest and thus continues respiration, during which carbohydrates are reduced to produce energy.21 Higher respiration after cutting may also increase the loss of flavor and nutritive value.22

Another cost to purchasing precut fruit is the plastic it comes in. Much of it ends up in landfills and the ocean. Precut fruit also requires processing, packing and constant refrigeration, requiring a great deal of energy.

Precut, All-Natural Fruit Comes With Additives

Additionally, to keep the fruit from turning brown, it may be dipped in calcium ascorbate23 to preserve color and texture. The chemical was part of the ingredients in NatureSeal,24 a product available for industrial and residential use.

According to the FDA,25 calcium ascorbate has a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) designation and is exempt from the usual food additive tolerance requirements.26 In 2001 the FDA cited NatureSeal for not listing calcium ascorbate on the label. NatureSeals states:27

&ldquoOur products are comprised of ingredients that are sulfite-free (GRAS), allergen-free, GMO-free, and Kosher and Halal certified, with some blends certified for use on organic produce.

The NatureSeal line of products are precise blends of vitamins and minerals that maintain the natural texture and color of fresh-cut produce for up to 21 days, without altering the flavor. 30+ different formulations are currently being used by over 500+ processors, across 30 different countries.&rdquo

The flawed GRAS system has allowed thousands of food additives to bypass stringent testing as a part of a loophole stemming from the 1958 Food Additives Amendment.28,29 When the law was written it was meant to apply to common food ingredients known through historical use to be safe.

However, the chemicals currently used didn't exist in the 1950s when the law was written, and countless manufactured ingredients are now slipping through this loophole.

Mashed30 shared several other reasons why purchasing precut fruits and vegetables may mean you're not getting what you expect. For instance, according to an article in the New York Post,31 reporting on issues raised in a documentary series entitled &ldquoRotten,&rdquo nearly 90% of the garlic sold around the world originates in China.32

Setting aside concerns about pollution with heavy metal, processed garlic is produced by Chinese prisoners who are responsible for peeling it. The job is difficult and often the prisoners&rsquo nails fall off. To continue to work, they are left to peel the garlic with their teeth.

Baby carrots are a popular snack food as they&rsquore easy to grab and go, as well as sweet, and they go well with a number of different dipping sauces, such as hummus. However, while carrots are nutrient dense, baby carrots are bathed in chlorine before sale, increasing your risk of exposure to disinfection byproducts, which are some of the most dangerous chemicals to your health.

The white areas that may appear on baby carrots is not a result of the chlorinated rinse but rather a sign of dehydration.33 Baby carrots are the result of larger carrots that have been pared down and stripped of the protective layer. Dehydration results in the white areas and likely a loss of nutrition and flavor.

Prepare Fruit and Vegetables to Reduce Possible Contamination

Once upon a time, all that was required to eat an apple was polishing it off on your jeans before taking a big bite. However, now pesticide residues and bacteria play an important role in food safety. According to Reuters,34 the EPA mandates harvested apples be soaked in bleach water for two minutes to remove bacteria and other "organic matter."

Unless you are purchasing organic produce, your food also likely contains pesticides. One study35 offered a surprisingly simple and affordable way to get rid of toxic pesticides contaminating food. The team from the University of Massachusetts used apples to examine the effectiveness of commercial and homemade washing agents.

Using highly specialized analysis, they found surface pesticide residue on apples was removed most effectively using baking soda (NaHCO3). The team tried tap water and Clorox bleach but neither worked as well as baking soda, which is highly alkaline. The authors wrote:36

&ldquoThis study gives us the information that the standard postharvest washing method using Clorox bleach solution for 2 min is not an effective means to completely remove pesticide residues on the surface of apples. The NaHCO3 method is more effective in removing surface pesticide residues on apples. In the presence of NaHCO3, thiabendazole and phosmet can degrade, which assists the physical removal force of washing.&rdquo

Strengthen Your Immune System Through Daily Lifestyle Choices

Purchasing your food from high-quality, small-scale local sources is one of the best ways to protect yourself from foodborne infection and pesticides. Another way to protect yourself from infection is to strengthen your immune system.

Ideally, by making daily lifestyle choices to support your overall health, you will strengthen your immune system and reduce your risk of infection. Crucial strategies to accomplishing this task include:

Avoiding sugar &mdash The average American consumers 17.4 teaspoons of sugar each day,37 and more disturbing is the excessive intake of fructose and high fructose corn syrup.

Fructose is a hepatotoxin, metabolized directly into fat.38 Sugar intake has a negative effect on your immune system.39 Substitute processed foods, especially those high in grains, fructose and sugar with plenty of organic raw foods.

Optimizing your gut health &mdash Your gut microbiota play a fundamental role in the function of your immune system.40 Taking a high-quality probiotic or eating fermented foods helps populate your gastrointestinal tract with good bacteria, your best defense against harmful bacteria like Salmonella.

Optimizing your sleep &mdash The amount of quality sleep you receive exerts a strong regulatory effect on your immune function.41 One study42 found sleep deprivation mirrors the body&rsquos immune response to exposure to stress. For more information see my previous article, &ldquoSleep &mdash Why You Need It and 50 Ways to Improve It.&rdquo

Reducing stress &mdash The level of stress you experience has a negative effect on your immune system.43,44,45 Find ways to relax consider yoga, Emotional Freedom Techniques, meditation and other recreational activities. For more suggestions see my previous article, &ldquoHow Stress Affects Your Body, and Simple Techniques to Reduce Stress and Develop Greater Resilience.&rdquo

Incorporating exercise &mdash Incorporating plenty of regular exercise each week will help support and strengthen your immune system.46 Find a form of exercise you enjoy and use the Nitric Oxide Dump daily to help support mitochondrial biogenesis and reduce insulin resistance, as I describe in &ldquoThe Benefits of Nitric Oxide Dump Exercise to Your Health.&rdquo

Optimizing vitamin D &mdash Using sensible sun exposure to optimize your natural vitamin D production, or taking a supplement if needed, will help modulate your immune responses. Deficiency is associated with an increased susceptibility to infection.47


@SunSprite wrote:

This is probably a foolish question (but that doesn't ever seem to stop me)----does anyone know if salmonella can originate from meats or other refrigerated items being unrefrigerated for too long?

It's probably my biggest fear about grocery delivery. It's been so blooming hot here. I always check the outside of any refrigerated or freezer item as soon as it is delivered to see if it feels cool to the touch.

It is a worry of mine though.

@SunSprite, no salmonella does not originate from foods not being refrigerated but if something is already contaminated the bacteria will rapidly multiply in warmth.

However, keep in mind that cooking salmonella contaminated foods to proper temperature (165 degrees or higher) will kill the bacteria.


Rose Acre shell eggs

You've probably been told you shouldn't eat raw cookie dough because of the danger inherent in raw eggs — though many of us don't listen to those warnings. In 2018, though, the danger became very, very real.

In April, Indiana's Rose Acre Farms issued a voluntary recall of more than 206 million eggs potentially contaminated with salmonella. The FDA says the eggs were distributed across West Virginia, Virginia, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, New York, New Jersey, Florida, and Colorado, and at least 22 illnesses were reported by people who had eaten the eggs.

Consumers were asked to check their cartons for a few numbers, including plant number P-1065 and Julian dates between 011 and 102. The eggs were repackaged and sold under a number of brand names, including Crystal Farms, Food Lion, Great Value, Coburn Farms, and Sunshine Farms — meaning that even if you didn't recognize the name Rose Acre, you still needed to check your eggs.

Complications from salmonella infections could include conditions as severe as arterial infections, endocarditis, and could even result in the development of arthritis. Skip the cookie dough. just for now.


Salmonella outbreak linked to precut melons sickens 117 people in 10 states

A salmonella outbreak linked to precut melon has affected 117 people in 10 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday.

The CDC and the Food and Drug Administration say the likely source of the outbreak is Caito Foods LLC in Illinois, but the investigation is ongoing.

On April 12, Caito voluntarily recalled several types of precut melon sold at Kroger, Target, Trader Joe's, Walmart, and Amazon.com under the Whole Foods label.

The recall includes precut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and precut fruit medley products. The fruit was distributed to Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. A full list of the recalled products is available on the FDA website .

"If you cannot determine if any precut melon you purchased was produced by Caito Foods LLC, don't eat it and throw it away," the CDC said.

The CDC said illnesses started on March 4 and continued to April 8. Thirty-two people have been hospitalized. The youngest infected consumer was less than a year old, and the oldest was 98. No deaths have been reported.

Salmonella is to blame for 1 million cases of foodborne illness in the United States every year, according to the CDC.

Symptoms usually begin 12 to 72 hours after consuming the bacteria and can last four to seven days. They include diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps, according to the CDC. Most people recover on their own. Patients who experience severe diarrhea may require hospitalization. If severely ill patients are not treated, the illness can be deadly.


Salmonella outbreak linked to precut melons sickens 117 people in 10 states

A salmonella outbreak linked to precut melon has affected 117 people in 10 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday.

The CDC and the Food and Drug Administration say the likely source of the outbreak is Caito Foods LLC in Illinois, but the investigation is ongoing.

On April 12, Caito voluntarily recalled several types of precut melon sold at Kroger, Target, Trader Joe's, Walmart, and Amazon.com under the Whole Foods label.

The recall includes precut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and precut fruit medley products. The fruit was distributed to Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. A full list of the recalled products is available on the FDA website .

"If you cannot determine if any precut melon you purchased was produced by Caito Foods LLC, don't eat it and throw it away," the CDC said.

The CDC said illnesses started on March 4 and continued to April 8. Thirty-two people have been hospitalized. The youngest infected consumer was less than a year old, and the oldest was 98. No deaths have been reported.

Salmonella is to blame for 1 million cases of foodborne illness in the United States every year, according to the CDC.

Symptoms usually begin 12 to 72 hours after consuming the bacteria and can last four to seven days. They include diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps, according to the CDC. Most people recover on their own. Patients who experience severe diarrhea may require hospitalization. If severely ill patients are not treated, the illness can be deadly.


Introduction

Prepared salads and fruits are generally considered safe to eat by consumers ( Food Standards Agency 2007a ), and consumption of these vegetables in the United Kingdom (UK) has increased in quantity and in variety in recent years ( Mintel International Group 2002 Food Standards Agency 2007a ), driven primarily by the trend towards healthier eating and in particular the Government’s 5 A DAY campaign (Food Standards Agency 2007a). The development of prepared salads has also been towards salad meals – adding a variety of other ingredients (like cheese, salmon, crayfish, pasta and couscous) to produce a wide variety of combinations. Raw and minimally processed fruit and salad vegetables are typically sold to the consumer in a ready-to-use or ready-to-eat form and depend on refrigeration as the primary means of preservation ( European Commission 2004 ). Ready-to-eat food, as defined by Regulation (EC) No. 2073/2005, ‘means food intended by the producer or the manufacturer for direct human consumption without the need for cooking or other processing effective to eliminate or reduce to an acceptable level micro-organisms of concern’ ( European Commission 2005 ).

Food production and consumption is an international business, with fresh produce and finished product being imported and exported in increasingly complex food production matrices, as a consequence of the proliferation of choice for consumers, rapid movement of goods by modern transportation, faster communication facilitating global trade and increasingly competitive markets ( Hutton 2001 ). Salad vegetables and fruit from around the world have now therefore become available to consumers year-round throughout the European Union (EU) which underlines the need for the international application of good hygienic standards for fresh produce. Strategies for preventing fruit and vegetables being contaminated with micro-organisms of concern, such as salmonellas, campylobacters, verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, during production have to rely on control measures taken during pre- and postharvest operations ( Fresh Produce Consortium 1999 Knight and Stanley 2000 Chilled Food Association 2007 Codex Alimentarius 2003 ). Food safety controls, underpinned by the application of good agricultural practices, good manufacturing practices, good hygiene practices and implementation of a hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) system, are therefore aimed to ensure that food reaching the consumer is safe to eat and thus in line with EU food hygiene legislation ( European Commission 2004, 2005 ).

Advances in farming and horticultural practices, processing and distribution have enabled the raw vegetable and fruit industry to supply high-quality produce to consumers all year-round. With changing food production and eating habits, new pathogens and newly recognized vehicles of infection have emerged ( Beuchat 1998 ).

Ready-to-eat fruit and vegetables requiring minimal or no further processing prior to consumption have been implicated as vehicles for transmission of infectious micro-organisms although the frequency of foodborne outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness associated with fruit and vegetables appears to be low compared to products of animal origin ( European Commission 2002b ). Nonetheless, foodborne illnesses associated with fruit and vegetables appear to be increasing in many countries ( European Commission 2002b ) either due to improved recognition or reporting, increased consumption, changes in commodities or production practices or a combination of these factors. The extensive outbreak of E. coli O157 infection in Japan in 1996 linked to sprouted radish ( Michino et al. 1999 ), and the more recent high profile North American outbreak of E. coli O157 infection associated with bagged fresh spinach in 2006 ( International Food Safety Authorities Network 2007 ), illustrates the potential for serious public health problems arising from the contamination of ready-to-eat fruit and vegetables, and have heightened concerns that these foods may be an increasing source of illness ( Tauxe 1997 ).

In the UK, the monitoring of microbiological food safety and the prevention of foodborne disease are the responsibility of a number of different interlinked public bodies [e.g. local authorities, Health Protection Agency (HPA), Food Standards Agency (FSA)], the food industry and other related organizations. This review describes general outbreaks of infectious intestinal diseases (IIDs) linked with prepared salads reported in England and Wales from 1992 to 2006, European outbreaks associated with prepared salads in international trade, national data on the prevalence of pathogens and indicator organisms from UK food studies and the outcomes and benefits of surveillance programmes.


Salmonella outbreak linked to precut melons sickens 117 people in 10 states

A salmonella outbreak linked to precut melon has affected 117 people in 10 states, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday.

The CDC and the Food and Drug Administration say the likely source of the outbreak is Caito Foods LLC in Illinois, but the investigation is ongoing.

On April 12, Caito voluntarily recalled several types of precut melon sold at Kroger, Target, Trader Joe's, Walmart, and Amazon.com under the Whole Foods label.

The recall includes precut watermelon, honeydew melon, cantaloupe, and precut fruit medley products. The fruit was distributed to Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. A full list of the recalled products is available on the FDA website .

"If you cannot determine if any precut melon you purchased was produced by Caito Foods LLC, don't eat it and throw it away," the CDC said.

The CDC said illnesses started on March 4 and continued to April 8. Thirty-two people have been hospitalized. The youngest infected consumer was less than a year old, and the oldest was 98. No deaths have been reported.

Salmonella is to blame for 1 million cases of foodborne illness in the United States every year, according to the CDC.

Symptoms usually begin 12 to 72 hours after consuming the bacteria and can last four to seven days. They include diarrhea, fever and stomach cramps, according to the CDC. Most people recover on their own. Patients who experience severe diarrhea may require hospitalization. If severely ill patients are not treated, the illness can be deadly.


Watch the video: Τα συμπτώματα της σαλμονέλας που πρέπει να αναγνωρίσετε εγκαίρως (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Dirg

    What talented phrase

  2. Mecatl

    I suggest you visit the site, on which there are many articles on this issue.

  3. Tlazopilli

    does not exist Probable

  4. Nawfal

    An incomparable phrase;)



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