Other

Prize Jumping Horse in Florida Slaughtered for Its Meat

Prize Jumping Horse in Florida Slaughtered for Its Meat



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Phedras de Blondel was slaughtered and butchered on a Florida farm

Horsemeat is illegal in Florida and is generally frowned upon in the U.S.

A powerful jumping horse was found slaughtered and butchered on a Palmetto, Florida, farm on October 25, and the farm's owners believe that whoever committed the crime wanted the horse’s meat.

The 1,300-pound horse, named Phedras de Blondel, was owned by champion equestrian Debbie Stephens and her husband.

“What they did to this horse had nothing to do with his value,” Stephens told ABC News. “It's one of the cruelest things that could happen to any horse. This just turned my life around.”

Horsemeat is illegal in Florida, but there is still an underground market for it. A bill passed in Florida to ban the sale of horsemeat for human consumption in 2010. There are no slaughterhouses in the U.S. approved to process horsemeat for human consumption.

Though eating horsemeat is rare and generally frowned uponin the U.S., it is common in many European countries and in some parts of Latin America and the Caribbean.

There are no suspects thus far. Stephens, her husband, and others have raised more than $18,000 as a reward for information leading to an arrest.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


How Much Do Horses Cost?

Anyone who owns a horse will probably tell you that the initial cost of the average riding horse is really only the tip of the iceberg. Keeping a horse is a luxury for many people. But how much does the 'average' horse cost? What's the difference between a free horse, a $500 horse, a $5,000 horse and one that can cost well over the $10,000 or $20,000 mark?

There are a number of factors that affect the cost of horses, and these don't really affect the $10,000-and-up horses. Those horses are being bought and sold by top name stud farms for use in high-level competition. They are often imported from Europe or elsewhere, with impressive bloodlines and have antecedents with international competition success. They're not likely to be purchased by the average first-time horse owner, and the prices aren't as impacted by market forces as the backyard riding horse prices are.

Most casual riders will be buying horses well below the $10,000 mark. A number of factors affect the price of horses, and several things have come into play in the last few years that have driven the initial cost of a horse down while driving the cost of keeping a horse up. When there is a slump in the economy it means fewer people all can afford to buy or keep horses. This means there are more horses for sale and fewer people to buy them. In economic downturns, many people are forced to give their horses away or sell them cheaply because they can't afford to look after them.


Watch the video: Das qualvolle Geschäft mit Pferdefleisch (August 2022).